Arabic Language Courses By Dialect

Yemeni Arabic Language Dialect

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Yemeni Arabic is a cluster of varieties of Arabic language dialects spoken in Yemen, southwestern Saudi Arabia, Somalia, and Djibouti. It is generally considered a very conservative dialect cluster, having many classical features not found across most of the Arabic speaking world.


The Yemeni Arabic language dialect can be divided roughly into several main dialect groups, each with its own distinctive vocabulary and phonology. The most important four groups are San’ani in the North and Center and Hadhrami in the East, where ⟨ق⟩ is pronounced [g] and ⟨ج⟩ is [d͡ʒ] or [ɟ] (except in coastal Hadhrami where ⟨ج⟩ is [j]), in addition to Ta’izzi-Adeni (also called Djibouti Arabic) in the South and Tihami in the West, where ⟨ق⟩ is [q] and ⟨ج⟩ is [g].

The Yemeni Arabic dialect is used for daily communications and has no official status.

Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) is used for official purposes, education, commerce and media.

Non-Arabic South Semitic languages indigenous to the region include several Modern South Arabian languages, such as the Mehri and Soqotri languages, which are not Arabic languages, but belong to an independent branch of the Semitic language family.

Another separate Semitic language family once spoken in the region is Old South Arabian. Most of these languages became extinct in the pre-Islamic period with the possible exception of the Razihi language. Some of these languages share features with the Yemeni Arabic language due to the influence from, or, on the Yemeni Arabic language.

More about Yemeni Arabic languages and dialects

Arabic, Hadrami Spoken

  • Hadramawt and Shabwah governorates.
  • Population: 4,560,000 in Yemen (2015).
  • Total users in all countries: 4,570,000.
  • Status: 6a* (Vigorous).
  • Alternate Names: Hadhrami Arabic, Hadrami, Hadromi, Ḥaḍrami Arabic.
  • Dialects: A member of macrolanguage Arabic [ara].
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

Arabic, Judeo-Yemeni

  • ‘Adan, Al Bayda’, Sanaa and Shabwah governorates: mainly urban communities; Shabwah governorate (Habban dialect).
  • Population: 300 in Yemen (2010 J. Berer).
  • Total users in all countries: 50,300.
  • Status: 8a (Moribund).
  • Alternate Names: Judeo-Yemeni, Yemenite Judeo-Arabic, Yeminite.
  • Dialects: San’a, ’Aden, Be:da, Habban. Jewish varieties markedly different from their coterritorial Muslim counterparts. A member of macrolanguage Judeo-Arabic [jrb].
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

Arabic, Ta’izzi-Adeni Spoken

  • Widespread.
  • Population: 9,660,000 in Yemen (2015).
  • Total users in all countries: 10,533,300.
  • Status: 6a* (Vigorous). De facto language of provincial identity in South Yemen.
  • Alternate Names: Southern Yemeni Spoken Arabic.
  • Dialects: Ta’izzi, Adeni. Ta’izzi dialect best accepted in Yemen. A member of macrolanguage Arabic [ara].
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

Arabic, Sanaani Spoken

  • Widespread; central areas: Amanat al Asimah and Sanaa governorates; outer areas: western Al Bayda’, Al Jawf, Al Mahwit, Amran, central and eastern Dhamar, eastern Hajjah, Ma’rib, and Sa’dah governorates.
  • Population: 11,100,000 in Yemen (2015).
  • Total users in all countries: 11,350,000.
  • Status: 6a* (Vigorous). De facto language of provincial identity in North Yemen.
  • Alternate Names: Northern Yemeni Arabic. Autonym: يمني‎ (Yamani).
  • Dialects: A member of macrolanguage Arabic [ara].
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

Bathari

  • Al Mahrah governorate.
  • Status: 8b (Nearly extinct).
  • Alternate Names: Bathara, Bautahari, Botahari.
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, South, South Arabian.

Hobyót

  • Al Mahrah governorate: near Oman border.
  • Population: 100 in Yemen (2001 J. Leclerc).
  • Status: 8a (Moribund).
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, South, South Arabian.

Mehri

  • Al Mahrah governorate.
  • Population: 50,000 in Yemen (2011).
  • Total users in all countries: 182,000.
  • Status: 7 (Shifting).
  • Alternate Names: Mahri.
  • Dialects: Western Mehri (Mehriyet), Eastern Mehri (Mehriyot). Within main dialects there are also differences between Bedouin and city varieties.
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, South, South Arabian.

Rāziḥī

  • Sa‘dah governorate: Rāziḥ district; Jabal Rāziḥ massif region, numerous small settlements.
  • Population: 62,900 (2004 census).
  • Status: 6a* (Vigorous).
  • Alternate Names: Jabal Razih, Rāziḥīt, S-samrit, Samrah Rāziḥīt, Samrit Rāziḥ.
  • Dialects: None known. Rāziḥī and local spoken varieties of Arabic are mutually unintelligible.
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central.

Soqotri

  • Amanat al Asimah governorate: ’Abd al-Kuri, Darsah, Samha, and Soqotra islands in the Gulf of Aden.
  • Population: 70,000 (2015 J. Leclerc).
  • Status: 8a (Moribund).
  • Alternate Names: Saqatri, Socotri, Sokotri, South Arabian, Suqutri.
  • Dialects: ’Abd Al-Kuri, Southern Soqotri, Northern Soqotri, Central Soqotri, Western Soqotri.
  • Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, South, South Arabian.

Website Editor : we would like here to thank our friend Yan Fan for her crash course about Sanaani-Yemeni dialect on her blog:
https://blog.fanofyan.com/yemeni/


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Egyptian Arabic Dialect

10$ Per Hour

Egyptian Arabic, locally known as the Egyptian colloquial Arabic language or Masry, meaning simply “Egyptian”, is spoken by most contemporary Egyptians.


Egyptian is a North African dialect of the Arabic language which is a Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. It originated in the Nile Delta in Lower Egypt near the capital Cairo.

Egyptian Arabic evolved from the Quranic Arabic which was brought to Egypt during the seventh century AD Muslim conquest that aimed to spread the Islamic faith among Egyptians.

Egyptian Arabic is highly influenced by the Egyptian Coptic language which was the native language of Egypt prior to the Islamic conquest, and later it had influences from other languages such as English, French, Italian, Greek and Turkish.

94 million Egyptians speak a continuum of dialects, among which Cairene is the most prominent. It is also understood across most of the Arabic speaking countries due to the predominance of Egyptian influence on the region as well as Egyptian media, and, more specifically, Egyptian cinema which has had a big influence in the MENA region for more than a century, along with the Egyptian music industry, making it the most widely spoken and one of the most widely studied varieties of Arabic.


While it is essentially a spoken language, it is encountered in written form in novels, plays and poems (vernacular literature), as well as in comics, advertising, some newspapers and transcriptions of popular songs.

In most other written media and in television news reporting, the Literary Arabic language is used. The Literary Arabic language is a standardized language based on the language of the Quran, that is, Classical Arabic (CA).

The Egyptian vernacular is almost universally written in the Arabic language alphabet for local consumption, although it is commonly transcribed into Latin letters or in the International Phonetic Alphabet in linguistics text and textbooks aimed at teaching non-native students. Also, it is written in the ASCII Latin alphabet mainly online and in SMSs.


As a result of Egypt’s prominent movie and music industries in the region, the Egyptian dialect is the most popular and the most commonly taught variety of Arabic to L2 speakers.

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