Arabic Language Courses By Dialects

Yemeni Arabic Dialect

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Yemeni Arabic is a cluster of varieties of Arabic spoken in Yemen, southwestern Saudi Arabia, Somalia,[5][6] and Djibouti.[7] It is generally considered a very conservative dialect cluster, having many classical features not found across most of the Arabic-speaking world.
Yemeni Arabic can be divided roughly into several main dialect groups, each with its own distinctive vocabulary and phonology. The most important four groups are San’ani in the North and Center and Hadhrami in the East, where ⟨ق⟩ is pronounced [g] and ⟨ج⟩ is [d͡ʒ] or [ɟ] (except in coastal Hadhrami where ⟨ج⟩ is [j]), in addition to Ta’izzi-Adeni (also called Djibouti Arabic[8]) in the South and Tihami in the West, where ⟨ق⟩ is [q] and ⟨ج⟩ is [g]. Yemeni Arabic is used for daily communications and has no official status; Modern Standard Arabic is used in official purposes, education, commerce and media.
Non-Arabic South Semitic languages indigenous to the region include several Modern South Arabian languages, such as the Mehri and Soqotri languages, which are not Arabic languages, but members of an independent branch of the Semitic family. Another separate Semitic family once spoken in the region is Old South Arabian; these became extinct in the pre-Islamic period with the possible exception of the Razihi. Some of these share areal features with Yemeni Arabic due to influence from or on Yemeni Arabic.
Yemeni Arabic is a cluster of varieties of Arabic spoken in Yemen, southwestern Saudi Arabia, Somalia,[5][6] and Djibouti.[7] It is generally considered a very conservative dialect cluster, having many classical features not found across most of the Arabic-speaking world.
Yemeni Arabic can be divided roughly into several main dialect groups, each with its own distinctive vocabulary and phonology. The most important four groups are San’ani in the North and Center and Hadhrami in the East, where ⟨ق⟩ is pronounced [g] and ⟨ج⟩ is [d͡ʒ] or [ɟ] (except in coastal Hadhrami where ⟨ج⟩ is [j]), in addition to Ta’izzi-Adeni (also called Djibouti Arabic[8]) in the South and Tihami in the West, where ⟨ق⟩ is [q] and ⟨ج⟩ is [g]. Yemeni Arabic is used for daily communications and has no official status; Modern Standard Arabic is used in official purposes, education, commerce and media.

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Egyptian Arabic Dialect

10$ Per Hour

Egyptian Arabic, locally known as the Egyptian colloquial language or Masry[3], meaning simply “Egyptian”, is spoken by most contemporary Egyptians.
Egyptian is a North African dialect of the Arabic language which is a Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. It originated in the Nile Delta in Lower Egypt near the capital Cairo. Egyptian Arabic evolved from the Quranic Arabic which was brought to Egypt during the seventh-century AD Muslim conquest that aimed to spread the Islamic faith among the Egyptians. Egyptian Arabic is highly influenced by the Egyptian Coptic language which was the native language of Egypt prior to the Islamic conquest,[4][5][6] and later it had influences from other languages such as English, French, Italian, Greek[7] and Turkish. The 94 million Egyptians speak a continuum of dialects, among which Cairene is the most prominent. It is also understood across most of the Arabic-speaking countries due to the predominance of Egyptian influence on the region as well as Egyptian media including Egyptian cinema which has had a big influence in the MENA region for more than a century along with the Egyptian music industry, making it the most widely spoken and one of the most widely studied varieties of Arabic.[8]
While it is essentially a spoken language, it is encountered in written form in novels, plays and poems (vernacular literature), as well as in comics, advertising, some newspapers and transcriptions of popular songs. In most other written media and in television news reporting, Literary Arabic is used. Literary Arabic is a standardized language based on the language of the Quran, that is, Classical Arabic. The Egyptian vernacular is almost universally written in the Arabic alphabet for local consumption, although it is commonly transcribed into Latin letters or in the International Phonetic Alphabet in linguistics text and textbooks aimed at teaching non-native learners. Also, it is written in ASCII Latin alphabet mainly online and in SMSs.
As a result of Egypt’s prominent Cinema and Music industry in the region, Egyptian dialect is the most popular and commonly taught variety of Arabic to L2 speakers.

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